Be honest to your heart


If only one principle should be followed for writing, my answer is that Be honest to your heart.
That is the meaning of writing itself.
Write down what have confused you, what you have learn, which you really think that they are valuable for others.

What is Clear Writing

Clear writing is writing that is incapable of being misunderstood
– Quintilian (100 AD)
How to Write Clearly - 10 Most Important Principles

Technique tips

1. Use vector graph in your paper.
Do not use pixel graphs since they will be distorted or become vague when transport to PDF.
Just copy the figure drawn in PPT or any vector graph editors to word directly.
(a tip is to copy the whole page of a slide to the word, and then cut off the unnecessary margin)

A demo when reading the advice for others.
Words you can do without
  • Temporal words such as “now”, “next” are either useless or a sign of a bad structure. Avoid the future tense (the word “will” in English) to refer to something coming up next in the document.
  • Most adverbs such as “very” are useless in a research paper.
  • Keep your emotions in check: the reader may not care for your surprise, pleasure and sadness.
  • Avoid the expression “so called”.
Run through this check list before submission
  • Are section headers consistent with respect to case? (“Our Methodology” versus “Our algorithm”)
  • Do the figures look nice? Are the fonts large enough for easy browsing? Are they readable once printed out in black-and-white? Can we see any compression artifacts?
  • If the page limit is x pages, do you have an x pages long paper?
  • Do you have at least one figure?
  • Is the layout of each page elegant?
  • Do you have widows or orphans?
  • Did you spell check?
  • Do you have a step-by-step toy example for every new algorithm being introduced? Present your examples early.
  • Are all equations arithmetically correct?
  • Can you replace some mathematical notation by plain English?
  • Are all terms defined?
  • Is the mathematical notation consistent? (If you use t for time in the first section, do you use t to note the term in the second section?)
  • Are the title and the abstract geared toward making the paper attractive?
  • Do you summarize your contribution in the introduction?
  • Is the bibliography consistent? (If you abbreviate first names once, do it all the way through. If you have page numbers once, have page numbers throughout.)
  • Is the spelling of all proper names correct? You would hate to get your paper reviewed by someone who would find his name misspelt in your paper.
  • Are the captions correct? Do you put the table caption before or after the table? Do you put the figure caption before or after the figure? Do you center captions or not?
  • Do you refer to a figure as “Fig. 1″ or as “Figure 1″? Which one is correct?
  • Are all internal references correct? If you refer to Fig. 10, does Figure 10 exists? (Some LaTeX package can mess this up, so always check!) Are all tables and figures referenced in the text?
  • If this is a recurring conference or a journal, have you compared your paper with ten or so other articles to make sure that yours is consistent with how these other papers look and feel?
  • Do you use the right fonts? Be watchful: sometimes the font for the section header can differ from the font used in the main text.
  • Do not use negations.
  • Avoid the future tense (the word "will" in English) to refer to something coming up next in the document.
  • Avoid temporal words such as \now" or \next".
  • Most adverbs|such as "very"|are useless in a research paper.
  • Keep your emotions in check: the reader may not care for
    your surprise, your pleasure or your sadness.
  • Use parenthesis and footnotes sparingly.
  • Meaningful section headers (Avoid: \theory", Prefer: \A proof that test A is valid")
  • Lists, bullet points, enumerations.
  • Simple, yet beautiful| gures.